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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 494 (some duplicates have been removed)
. the u.s. trade gap narrows as the world buys more made in america products and the u.s. buys less foreign oil. >> susie: and with gas prices rising, chevy hopes its new diesel chevy cruze will attract buyers looking for more miles per gallon. >> tom: that and more tonight on "n.b.r." >> susie: millions of people are bracing tonight for a powerful snow storm that could cripple the east coast. some forecasters say this could be the blizzard of the century with record amounts of snow and extremely strong winds. in parts of the northeast, transportation was shut down. the governors of massachusetts and connecticut declared a state of emergency and banned car travel, train service and cancelled flights in and out of boston. while the worst of the storm has yet to hit, many businesses and cities were busy making preparations today. erika miller reports. >> reporter: this monstrous storm is already being compared to the great blizzard of '78, when vast amounts of snow blanketed the ohio valley and the great lakes. that storm lasted 36 hours, leaving cars stranded. this storm could also b
, the obama administration claims it has legal authority to assassinate u.s. citizens overseas even if there is no intelligence indicating they are engaged in an active plot to attack the u.s. we will speak with jameel jaffer from the aclu. the obama administration is claiming the legal authority to indefinitely detain americans without charge or trial. >> the way in which our fundamental rights, our bill of rights, our constitution freedoms have been abridged by the last 10 years and more as president obama is unhappily following in that tradition. >> we will speak with whistleblower daniel ellsberg who is in new york this week to attend an appeal in his lawsuit against the ndaa. we will speak with computer security researcher jacob appelbaum who lost a federal appeals court ruling that the government could subpoena his twitter and e-mail information without a warrant as part of its probe into wikileaks. the boy scouts of america prepared to vote on whether to lift its ban on gay members. >> the question always comes down to, can case raise quick -- raise kids? most people really d
. >>> fueled by a weaker yen and strong sales of cameras in the u.s. >>> and shares in virgin media rally after an offer for a takeover that could value the uk cable operator at $20 billion. >> all right. welcome to tuesday. >> it's get together tuesday. coordinated, as well. >> the final print for the eurozone is finally come in, 48.6, a little better than the forecast of 48.2. >> may i just say, though, the employment index, look at that, 46.1, which is just barely better than the flash estimate but still the lowest since december 2009. on a downward trajectory. it's not germany where the final composite was 54.4. it's the periphery still. france's final january pmi falls to 46.1. >> france is where the concern is. we have francois hollande today speaking to the eu parliament. he's going to lay out his vision for the eu against that economic back drop. >> isn't it amazing? we come into the week yesterday with everyone still talking. you have that great barons cover, you come in, just get the risk trade massively off. and the question for today and the rest of the week is frankly whether that'
that, down we go displuz for most of the u.s., households use natural gas. they don't use heating oil. and the ones that do are mostly in the northeast. so come march, will their pricees, their home bills be down? >> by the end of march, it will be much lower. 10% lower is what i'm estimating. >> susie: let me talk to you about gasoline because we've also seen gasoline prices have been going up every single day for the last 21 days and averaging $3.55 a gallon. where can we expect gasoline prices to go over the next couple of weeks? >> i think it's going to follow a similar trend of heating oil. i think we have another two to three weeks of somewhat higher prices. after, that i also think it's going to go down. the reason why, refineries are going to switch over to unleaded gas and there will be more than enough supply in the marketplace, and because of that i think we see a drop. i think we're going to see a 20 cent drop by the end of march. >> susie: also, tell us about supplies, we saw during hurricane sandy here in the middl northeast, most people were not prepared to be short on
cases, u.s. citizens. our national investigative correspondent michael isikoff broke the story and has our report. >> reporter: drones have been called president obama's weapon of choice. during his four years as commander in chief, u.s. military and cia drone strikes have accelerated at an unprecedented pace. more than 400 cia strikes against targets in pakistan and yemen. eight times as many as under president bush. >> they have been very precise, precision strikes against al qaeda and their affiliates. >> these strikes are legal. they are ethical. and they are wise. >> reporter: but today, new questions about drone strikes targeting american citizens, including anwar al awlaki. born in new mexico and killed in yemen in 2011. he allegedly directed the so-called underwear bomber, who tried to blow up an airliner over detroit in 2009. but awlaki was never charged with a crime. nbc news has obtained this confidential 16-page justice department memo that concludes lethal strikes against u.s. citizens who are operational leaders of al qaeda are a lawful act of national self-defense. >> we
in london or certainly in the u.s. they wouldn't mind seeing at this point. >> we've created a million private sector jobs. >> in britain? >> yeah. >> well, congratulations. >> there you go. that is the great conundrum, right? >> it's true. the different between -- well, and even with germany. the liesh market social security holding up, despite the sharp contraction in the fourth quarter. although this will probably add to the sense that the german economy bottomed during that period. >> did i see any -- i haven't seen any, no. i think that's out a little later. plenty to get through on today's program. >> it's good to be back, by the way. >> biggest take away from the mobile world congress? what's the one thing you saw that you thought, oh, that is really cool. >> i go to a conference like this and i think, machine res taking over the world. >> that's the thing we talk about. i don't like those machine peps. >> exactly. so 50 billion connected-m devic. that's a figure thatjs -- some y the point is, it isn't just about you and i talking to each other on a mobile phone. we are well bey
. >> and is steady as she goes, the u.s. economy is expected to keep up the recent trend of modesty of unspectacular job growth in january. >>> plus, the dutch finance minister warns of a worsening deficit this year, this after the government is forced to bail out local banks after a bailout of 3.7 million euros. >>> we kick off with the pmis out of the eurozone. january manufacturing pmi, 47.9. the flash 47.5, december manufacturing pmi was 46.1. it has boosted the euro to maintain its gaze, now back over to 1.3651 and continuing to climb high. that is now a 32-month high against the yen, as well, at 11.25965. the german manufacturing pmi was a little better, as well, this morning. helping to boost those numbers. we suggest that there's benefits from emerging markets rather than, perhaps, from elsewhere in europe. anyway, coming in better once again for the eurozone. still in contraction territory, but, of course, the trend is what is being concentrated on. we had similar indicators for two die verging views on china's recovery. eases to 50.4 for january, that was below the forecast of 5079 the. bu
officials are trying to find out who made the decision to lock on. now, the u.s. state department spokesperson expressed her concern over the incident. >> actions such as this escalate tensions and increase the risk of an incident or a miscalculation, and they could undermine peace, stability, and economic growth in this vital region. so we are concerned about it. >> u.s. officials have been increasingly uneasy about rising tensions in the area. >>> military analysts are trying to figure out what the chinese are trying to do. bonji ohara is a former navy captain with japan's self-defense forces. he says the chinese sent a clear message. >> it is a serious thing. if the radar is the fire-control radar, can control the weapon, usually a battlhipas that kind of radar, one is searching radar, for navigation. one is for the targeting, control weapon radar. this is the fc radar. this time chinese side used this fc radar. it means they showed to the ship they have the intention to attack the japanese ship. so it is very serious and danger. i think the -- there are two ssib scenarios one
of last year, there are fresh worries about the state of the u.s. economy and profits for this year. on top of that, financial conditions in the eurozone are still a threat to u.s. stocks. >> with the market at current levels, which... basically looks like they're priced for perfection, there doesn't leave a lot of room for any disappointing news. and there are a lot of areas that could create disappointing news. >> reporter: weissberg says many market pros believe stocks are headed higher, but they need a catalyst, and that's unlikely to come from tonight's state of the union. suzanne pratt, "n.b.r.," new york. >> susie: still ahead, why ailing smartphone maker blackberry is hoping the sports market will help it on its road to recovery. we'll explain in tonight's "beyond the scoreboard." a "silly sideshow--" that's what apple c.e.o. tim cook called a recent lawsuit filed by hedge fund manager david einhorn. speaking at a goldman sachs technology conference today, cook also said apple is considering einhorn's proposal to issue preferred stock and return more money to shareholders. e
agreement from the u.s. department of education's ready to learn grant, and viewers like you, thank you. play awesome electric company games and earn points for your favorite person, like me, hector. i mean, i'm your favorite, right? so what are you waiting for? i'm great at telling people what to do. hey kids! pick up that trash. kidding with these, right? hey! (sneezing) bless you! captioning sponsored by wpbt >> this is n.b.r. >> tom: good evening. i'm tom hudson. susie is off tonight. the easy talk, but difficult plans to meet the challenge of creating more middle class jobs. finance ministers and central bankers from the world's biggest economies meet to debate spending cuts versus growth. we look at international investing and pockets of strength around the globe. and, hedge fund manager carl icahn ups his stake in herbalife, calling the vitamin maker a legit business. that and more tonight on "n.b.r." investors spent much of this week focused on the u.s. market with major market indexes hitting five-year highs. but now the spotlight is shifting overseas. g-20 finance minister
erican greetings, proud sponsor of "the electric company." agreement from the u.s. department of education's ready to learn grant, and viewers like you, thank you. go online now to pbskidsgo.org and play some electric company games. you can win points forll of your favorite people, or your most favorite person, me, manny spamboni. now go, because the next time i see you, i better have more points. you're almost there! i need that cheese. you got it, you got it! come on, buddy, i need the cheese. and didn't we know how to a...da -- sorry. (laughter) ooh, i threw my neck out! captioning sponsored by wpbt >> this is n.b.r. >> susie: good evening. i'm susie gharib. hewlett-packard's turnaround gains traction, c.e.o. meg whitman in with a winning quarter and an improved outlook. >> tom: i'm tom hudson. from weakening demand, to currency concerns, we look at what's behind the big selloff in commodities. >> susie: and u.s. companies and infrastructure are increasing under the threat of cyber attack. we look at a new plan tying safeguards to trade policy. >> tom: that and more tonight
-qaeda rebels that the u.s. doesn't support. i don't want to see them at the top of the heap. >> rose: that's always the answer to the question people always ask. suppose you win what then. >> it's a good question. right now they're not winning. right now you have a situation where assad is pretty entrenched and the rebels are making gammons -- games but they don't seem to be decisive yet. >> rose: able to close the deal. >> not yet. so you're looking at a fairly drawn out conflict. one of the concerns people have is if the conflict is drawn out much longer, there won't be much left to hand over to oppose the assad regime. the whole mechanism and institutions of the state will have been destroyed. >> rose: let me make sure i understand. i have your piece in front of me and i read it several times. you are reporting from people within the whitehouse they're beginning to consider as a condition deteriorates reopening that debate. is that the extent of what you're saying. >> the way i would put it is they haven't ruled it out and down the road they may reconsider it. and really the emphasis
they can make in mexico and what they can do outside the u.s. >> reporter: anheuser-busch inbev offered to sell of it's interest inn importing arm nstlati bras anmake the company the sole importer of corona beer for ten years. but the justice department says that solution does not go far enough. darren gersh, "n.b.r.," washington. >> susie: on wall street today, stocks finished lower on mixed news about the economy, and worries about tomorrow's important jobs report. jobless claims rose by 38,000, more than expected. consumer spending rose slightly in december, as personal income climbed 2.6%, the highest increase in eight years, on this last trading day of january, the dow lost almost 50 points, the nasd was unchanged, and the s&p fell about four points. despite the sell off today, january was a strong month for stocks. the dow surged 6%, its best january since 1994. a 4% gain on the nasdaq, and the s&p jumped 5%. on wall street, they say a big january for stocks usually means a big year as well, it's called the "january barometer." if stocks follow history, they could be up by 20% or
. that and more tonight on "n.b.r." investors spent much of this week focused on the u.s. market with major market indexes hitting five-year highs. but now the spotlight is shifting overseas. g-20 finance ministers and central bankers are meeting in moscow over the weekend. they will be debating the need for austerity, versus the need to spur growth. no one expects a quick turnaround for the european economy, which has been mired in recession. but as erika miller reports, that may make now a good time to invest. >> reporter: it would makes sense that american investors would be loading up on u.s. stocks with the market here doing so well. but they're not. last week, investors in stock mutual funds put virtually all their cash in international markets. more than $3 billion went into funds holding international stocks. by comparison, mutual funds holding u.s. stocks suffered their first outflows of the year. investment advisors say small investors may be on to something. >> international investing has had a bad reputation over the last couple of years had a bad experience, people have taken money ou
in commodities. >> susie: and u.s. companies and infrastructure are increasing under the threat of cyber attack. we look at a new plan tying safeguards to trade policy. >> tom: that and more tonight on "n.b.r."! >> susie: on the comeback trail, hewlett packard posting better than expected first quarter results tonight, as a wide- ranging revamp of the struggling computer maker takes hold. and its shares take flight, rising over 6% in after hours trading. h.p. earned $0.82 a share, $0.11 better than wall street had anticipated. and revenues, while down at $28.4 billion, also beat the street. c.e.o. meg whitman has been on the job 17 months, speaking with investors today, whitman said she felt good about the rest of the year, and that last year's hard work was paying off for h.p. but, analysts say h.p. is not out of the woods yet. >> it's the type of thing that can be fixed quickly. this isn't going to take several years to play out so first of all it seems like meck whitman's vision is very much on track but we're not seeing that play out in the financials, but it is encouraging that guidance wa
a 500 pound settlement with u.s. and uk regulators later this week. rbs will cover the bonus pools after a warning from the government that taxpayers should not foot the bill. rbs is planning to float the 316 branches of santander it has so far failed to sell. according to the papers, an ipo would allow the bank to dispose of that unit cleanly. lots going on. we're pleased to be joined by michael brown. welcome. >> happy monday morning. >> i know you want to talk about the super bowl. >> well, that would be nice given i was up watching it. >> i'm impressed. i should have been up staying up all night. my sister lives in baltimore. >> there are plenty of bank stories to get to in the meantime. >> absolutely. >> we're going to hear from george osborne in just a couple on hours' time. what does this mean? >> the idea is, of course, that we should have capital in both parts. but the problem is, there isn't enough capital to go around and, therefore, you don't want to spook the financial markets by saying, by the way, yes, you do need to have this. how do we get to where we want to be, i.e. en
meeting. they're due out later this afternoon in the u.s. will the fomc offer clues on an end to qe3? we're joined at 11:30 to weigh in. >>> with india's government clouded in corruption allegations, we'll speak to one of the country's wealthiest individuals and what it means for business. billionaire udai kotak joins us in 20 minutes' time. >>> plenty coming up including sony which is heading to the bill apple for a major on, national endowment. will the game console giant take the wraps off its rumored playstation? expert analysis at 11:20 cet. >>> and bhb bulletin has posted a steep fall in earnings for the first time in the year. the australian mining giant announced change at the top after the 43% drop in profit. we have more on this report from sydney. >> reporter: the surprise at bhp, billiton's ceo mariu marius kloppers announcement coming earlier than expected. >> coincided today with a weaker pricing environment. but two totally unrelated events. >> reporter: he will be replaced by andrew mckenzie, current head of bhp's middles division. he's well regarded in the industry and s
ahead on our program tonight, ford is hiring in high oy, please take a look creating new job. the u.s. economy is not adding jobs, the claims for uninsurance benefits up pas past-- combined with continued worries about economic growth lead the major stroke averages lower within the s&p 500 off by 9.5. >> susie: stocks weren't the only investments falling today. many commodities also ended lower, on top of steep declines yesterday. u.s. oil futures fell to there lowest point this year, closing at $92.84 a barrel. so what's at the root of the commodities sell-off, and will it continue? erika miller reports. >> reporter: selling was heavy in crude oil today, as it was in most commodities. but crude also fell on new inventory data showing a big jump in oil supplies. >> today we had an inventory number which came out, which we were expecting a build of around two million barrels. we got a build of around four million barrels. >> reporter: across the room, gold futures were little changed. although industrial metals like platinum and palladium got slammed. grain prices also plunged, with wh
." agreement from the u.s. department of education's ready to learn grant, and viewers like you, thank you. mmy, bat, nuggets and all your favorite animated characters are auditioning, and you're the judge. so plug into pbskidsgo.org and play to decide who has what it takes. wait, wait, jess, don't leave. i'll help you out here. pull! (glass breaking) cut! captioning sponsored by wpbt >> this is n.b.r. >> susie: good evening everyone. i'm susie gharib. worries about political gridlock, in italy and in washington, cause investors to dump stocks. it's the worst day for wall street since the november elections. >> tom: i'm tom hudson. with $85 billion in federal spending cuts just days away, we talk with congresswoman cathy mcmorris rodgers. >> susie: and the man who founded barnes and noble wants to buy his bookstores back, but he has no interest in the company's electronic book reader b&n's nook business. >> tom: that and more tonight on "n.b.r."! >> susie: a sharp sell off on wall street today, as stocks suffered their biggest drop since november. italian and american politics put investors in
to taking an action that's going to mitigate that threat. gwen: when is it ok to use u.s. drones to kill americans? and when does congress get to know about it? >> if the executive branch makes a mistake and kills the wrong person or a group of the wrong people, how should the government acknowledge that? gwen: closer to home, did the folks who issue credit ratings make the mortgage crisis worse? the justice department says yes. >> we believe that s&p played a significant role in helping to bring our economy to the brink of collapse. gwen: and on politics, republicans and democrats map out the future. >> it's important not to read too much into any particular political victory, because this country is big, it is diverse, it is contentious, and we don't have a monopoly on wisdom. >> to uphold this legacy of those who have come before us, washington will need to make some choices. and in a divided government, these choices are often tough. gwen: covering the week, carrie johnson of nph, pete williams of nbc news, alexis simendinger of real clear politics, and beth reinhard of "national jou
-off. u.s. markets fell yesterday following the release of the fed minutes. it was the worst day of the year for the s&p and nasdaq. as you can see, shedding 108 points there, a rare triple digit decline this year. energy and material stocks were the worst hit. all ten s&p sectors did hit the day lower. volatility on the rise. the vix rose nearly 20% on this session. the sell-off has continued overnight. the shanghai composite, the australian markets taking it on the chin. will i sixuan joins us from singapore. >> thank you, kelly. fears of an early access by the fed rocks sentiment here in asia today. the nikkei pulls back 1.4% from its 52-month high. investors remain cautious ahead of the decision on the next boj chief. construction equipmentmakers were down after caterpillar reported slowing sales for the quarter ending january. but batterymaker gsyuasa reported a fix over long-term battery problems. the shanghai composite tumbled to 3% today. commodity place were under a lot of pressure today after the u.s. fomc minutes raised the possibility of a qe asset. development and ce
shut for the chinese new year and large parts of the u.s. struggling with extreme weather. >> digging out from nemo, residents and u.s. businesses hope to resume to normal business after mother nature dumped nearly three feet of snow in some areas. >>> and ben affleck's iran hostage drama "argo" picks up the best film accolade. daniel day-lewis wins best actor. >>> we're up for another week. we might do what they did and share the love around. >> i read the reports. we're going to talk about it later. there was no one dominant film. >> i thought it was interesting that "argo" won best picture? it was a great movie, but best movie? really? is that the -- >> "lincoln" only got -- sometimes they're quite clued up. the nominations were very similar. do you think lincoln would do better than it did. >> daniel day-lewis picked up an award. help recap for those of us who didn't catch the whole thing or any of it, frankly, but yeah, britain's big film night. now it's time for the u.s. in a couple of weeks. >> besides that, plenty of other things we're looking at today. another day, another su
numbers are a positive sign for the u.s. economy. investors were worried about some not so good signals today about europe's economy. stocks turned negative on comments from europe's central bank president saying the strong euro could dampen europe's recovery. here on wall street, the dow fell 42 points, the nasdaq lost three and the s&p slipped over two points. >> tom: still ahead, douglas burtnick joins us, he's with aberdeen asset management. >> susie: a battle is brewing between a big name hedge fund investor and apple. at issue: how to get apple to unlock value for shareholders. today david einhorn of greenlight capital sued apple to block a move that would stop the use of preferred shares. shareholders will vote on this at apple's annual meeting on february 27. what einhorn is proposing is that apple pay out more of its cash hoard to investors, using a special kind of preferred stock. einhorn has a lot at stake: his fund owns more than one million shares of apple, and while the stock rose a bit today, it's down 35% since its peak of $700 last september. late today apple issued thi
companies, and investors are seeing in the u.s. economy. we preview the economic state of the union. why regulators need to treat them like other business. then u.s. airways sees big benefits in merging with american airlines. we look at the new landscape for airlines if the deal goes through. we have that anmore tonight on nbr. president obama is preparing to deliver his first state of the union address of his new term, tomorrow. the american people will be listening carefully to his plans to grow the economy, especially as they struggle with less take home pay, and worries about their jobs. while there are signs of improvement in the economy, the unemployment rate rose in january to 7.9%. so what is the current state of the economy? erika miller talked to two experts with different views. >> reporter: it may seem strange to many investors that the stock market can be hovering at five- year highs, when the economy is so weak. but what's fueling the rally is not the current situation, it's hope. >> we've taken out some of the downside tail risks. so, we're feeling like although it's not
by groups opposed to economic reform, on top of that, u.s. equities face a looming friday deadline for massive government budget cuts, known as "sequestration." the dow tumbled 216 points, the nasdaq fell nearly 46, and the s&p 500 lost 28 points. while there's been much talk of a correction in the stock market, sequestration may not be the catalyst. suzanne pratt reports. >> reporter: it is widely accepted on wall street that sequestration is coming. and, with it a new reason for the fragile u.s. economy to sputter. but, what will the first phase of billions of dollars in federal spending cuts actually do to the u.s. stock market? after all, major market averages are hovering close to all-time highs, and don't forget investors are finally warming up to equities again. floor broker art cashin says today's selling was mostly a reaction to italy's election, and that the stock market is not yet focused on sequestration. >> i don't think that even we slip into sequestration it will have the same dramatic effect that the fiscal cliff and the debt ceiling had. it is seen as somewhat temp
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 494 (some duplicates have been removed)

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